Total recordable injury frequency

Definition: The number of fatalities, lost-time injuries, cases of alternative work necessitated by an injury and other recordable injuries, excluding first-aid injuries, per million working hours.

Developments: The total recordable injury frequency (including both Statoil employees and contractors) decreased from 5.4 in 2008 to 4.1 in 2009. For Statoil employees, the frequency  decreased from 3.4 in 2008 to 2.9 in 2009, and for our contractors, the total recordable injury frequency decreased from 6.6 in 2008 to 4.8 in 2009.

Lost-time injury frequency

Definition: The number of lost-time injuries and fatal accidents per million working hours.

Developments: The lost-time injury frequency (including both Statoil employees and contractors) decreased from 2.1 in 2008 to 1.6 in 2009. The frequency for Statoil employees decreased from 1.7 in 2008 to 1.4 in 2009, and for our contractors, the lost-time injury frequency decreased from 2.3 in 2008 to 1.7 in 2009.

Serious incident frequency

Definition: The number of incidents of a very serious nature per million working hours (1).

Developments: The serious incident frequency (including both Statoil employees and contractors) decreased from 2.2 in 2008 to 1.9 in 2009.

(1) An incident is an event or chain of events that has caused or could have caused injury, illness and/or damage to/loss of property, the environment or a third party. Matrices for categorisation have been established in which all undesirable incidents are categorised according to the degree of seriousness, and this forms the basis for follow-up in the form of notification, investigation, reporting, analysis, experience transfer and improvement.

Sickness absence

Definition: The total number of days of sickness absence as a percentage of possible working days (Statoil employees).

Developments: Sickness absence in Statoil increased from 3.7 % in 2008 to 4.0 % in 2009. At the same time, the reporting scope has increased and larger parts of the organisation are now included. Sickness absence in Statoil ASA in Norway has been stable in recent years at approximately 4.0 %. The sickness absence is closely followed up by managers at all levels.

Oil spills

Definition: Unintentional oil spills to the natural environment from Statoil operations (in cubic metres) (2).

Developments: The monthly average number of unintentional oil spills in 2009 is still stable. The total volume of spilled oil (net volume > 0) has however been reduced with about 50 % as compared to 2008.

(2) All unintentional oil spills reaching the natural environment from Statoil operations are included in the figure.

Definition: Other unintentional spills to the natural environment from Statoil operations (in cubic metres) (3). 

Developments: The number of other unintentional spills (net volume > 0) in 2009 is at the same level compared to 2008. The total volume of spills in 2009 has however been reduced by nearly 35 % as compared to 2008.

(3) All unintentional spills of chemicals, produced water, ballast water and polluted water reaching the natural environment from Statoil operations are included. 

CO2 emissions

Definition: Total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) in million tonnes from Statoil operated activities (4)

Developments: CO2 emissions decreased from 14.4 million tonnes in 2008 to 13.1 million tonnes in 2009. Both CO2 from energy production and CO2 from flaring have been reduced. This is mainly because of a reduction in Exploration and Production Norway of approx. 1.1 million tonnes CO2. International Exploration and Production has a reduction of approx. 0.2 million tonnes CO2 from 2008 to 2009. This is mainly due to reduced flaring at South Pars and production at Lufeng only first half 2009.

(4) Carbon dioxide emissions include carbon dioxide from energy and heat production, flaring (including well testing/well work-over), rest emissions from carbon dioxide capture and treatment plants and process emissions.

NOx emissions

Definition: Total emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thousand tonnes from Statoil operated activities (5)

Developments: NOx emissions decreased from 46.7 thousand tonnes in 2008 to 42.3 thousand tonnes in 2009. Both NOx from energy production and NOx from flaring have been reduced. All business areas have reduced their NOx emissions.

(5) Nitrogen oxide emissions include nitrogen oxides from energy and heat production in our own plants, transportation of products, flaring (included well testing/well work over) and treatment plants.

CH4 emissions

Definition: Total emissions of methane (CH4) from Statoil operated activities (6) 

Developments: CH4 emissions were 32900 tonnes in 2009. CH4 emissions are approximately 10 % higher in 2009 compared to the year 2008. CH4 from energy production and methane from flaring has been reduced. CH4 from diffuse sources (including cold venting) has increased.

(6) CH4 emissions include CH4 from energy- and heat production in own plant, flaring (included well testing/well work over), cold venting, diffuse emissions and also storage and loading of crude oil.

Global warming potential (GWP)

Definition: Global warming potential (GWP) is Statoil's share of greenhouse gas emissions from Statoil operated activities and activities operated by others (7)

Developments: GWP was 10.0 million tonnes CO2 equivalents for 2009. GWP has been at the same level through the year 2009.

(7) The unit of measurement is "tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent". This indicator is calculated based on Statoil's share of emissions of carbon dioxide and methane, using the following formula:  [1*(emissions of CO2)]+[21*(emissions of CH4)].

Energy consumption

Definition: Total energy consumption in terawatt-hours (TWh) for Statoil operated activities (8)

Developments: Energy consumption decreased from 69.6 TWh in 2008 to 63.6 TWh in 2009. The energy consumption and the CO2 emissions basically follow the same pattern.

(8) Energy consumption includes energy from power- and heat production based on combustion, unused energy from flaring (including well testing/well work-over and venting), energy sold/delivered to third party and gross energy (heat and electricity) imported from contractor.

Non-hazardous waste recovery rate

Definition: The recovery rate for non-hazardous waste comprises non-hazardous waste from Statoil-operated activities and represents the amount of non-hazardous waste for recovery as a proportion of the total quantity of non-hazardous waste (9)

Developments: The non-hazardous waste recycling ratio has been at the same level (63-73 %) during 2009 and the average value for 2009 was 69 % .

(9) The quantity of non-hazardous waste for recovery is the total quantity of non-hazardous waste from the plant's operations that has been delivered for re-use, recycled or incinerated with energy recovery.

Hazardous waste recovery rate

Definition: The hazardous waste recovery rate for comprises hazardous waste from Statoil operated activities and represents the amount of hazardous waste for recovery as a proportion of the total quantity of hazardous waste (10)

Developments: The amount of hazardous waste has increased by approx. 10% in 2009 compared to the year 2008. The waste recovery ratio has decreased from 86 % in 2008 to 61 % in 2009.

(10) The quantity of hazardous waste for recovery is the total quantity of hazardous waste from the plant's operations that has been delivered for re-use, recycled or incinerated with energy recovery (the total amount of hazardous waste, excluding hazardous waste sent to an approved deposition facility).